Tag: ptsd

Bush hosts summit on helping veterans transition

DALLAS (AP) — Efforts must be made to end the stigma attached to post-traumatic stress disorder, which can hinder military veterans’ transition into civilian life and employment, former President George W. Bush said Wednesday.

Addressing a summit at the George W. Bush Institute in Dallas, Bush said some veterans are reluctant to seek help and that employers often don’t realize the condition can be treated.

“As a result of public misunderstanding, employers sometimes cite it as a reason for not hiring vets,” Bush said.

“As most doctors today will tell you, post-traumatic stress is not a disorder. Post-traumatic stress or PTS is an injury that can result from the experience of war,” he said. “And like other injuries, PTS is treatable.”

Bush said his institute has been working with Syracuse University on a study of the issues affecting veterans who have served since 9/11. Bush said full results of the study will be released this spring and that the information will help employers understand what veterans have to offer, noting that both veterans and employers have a hard time translating military experience.

“You don’t see many job postings that say: ‘Wanted: Experience hunting insurgents and terrorists. Willing to risk life for co-workers,'” Bush said.

“Or what’s a veteran supposed to put down?” he asked. “My last office was a Humvee?”

He said that the institute will also work with higher education officials on how to recruit and retain veterans.

“We recognize that in helping our veterans we can unleash the potential of a generation of resourceful, determined and experienced leaders,” Bush said.

Jill Biden, wife of Vice President Joe Biden, also spoke at the summit that included panel discussions with former military leaders, business people and nonprofit leaders. Jill Biden and first lady Michelle Obama founded the Joining Forces campaign to rally the country around its servicemen and servicewomen.

“Our military families have done so much for our country and each of us can do something in return,” she said.

The summit is part of the institute’s Military Service Initiative, which has also hosted golf tournaments and mountain bike rides for those wounded while serving in the military. The institute is part of Bush’s presidential center on the campus of Southern Methodist University in Dallas.

Associated Press
Posted on February 20, 2014

Suicides in the Army declined sharply in 2013

FORT CARSON, Colo. — Suicides in the Army fell by 19 percent in 2013, dramatically reversing a rising trend plaguing the Army for almost 10 years.

There were 150 suicides among soldiers on active-duty status last year, down from a record 185 in 2012, according to Army data. The numbers include both confirmed and suspected suicides.

Lt. Gen. Howard Bromberg, chief of Army personnel, says he is cautiously optimistic in seeing success in Army programs to avert suicides by giving soldiers coping strategies for keeping a positive or optimistic outlook.

“I’m not declaring any kind of victory here,” Bromberg says. “It’s looking more promising.”

Within the ranks, it has meant that people such as Levertis Jackson, an Afghanistan War veteran whose despair led him several times to try to kill himself, have chosen life.

“It was like before, all my doors were closed, and I’m in a dark room,” says Jackson, 41, married and father of four. “(Now) I look for reasons why I need to continue to live.”

He left the Army last year after completing an experimental treatment plan at Fort Carson that helps soldiers cope with deadly, self-destructive impulses. Research results slated to be published in the Journal of the American Medical Association show a promising 60 percent reduction in suicide attempts by 30 soldiers who participated in the program.Efforts such as this one conducted by the National Center for Veterans Studies at the University of Utah and the University of Memphis are part of complex effort by the Army to reduce suicides. Larger initiatives include years of expanding behavioral health counseling.

“I think we’ve hit the turning point where people are really, really talking about behavioral health and the fact that it’s OK to have problems. It’s what you do with those problems that’s important,” Bromberg says.

The Army has spent tens of millions of dollars in a long-term study of suicide, teaming with the National Institutes of Health, and has developed a comprehensive program of instilling emotional resilience in soldiers.

Suicide researchers say the decline may be the inevitable result of the nation ending involvement in one war in Iraq and winding down its role in another in Afghanistan.

“I get the sense when I work with military people now, they just don’t seem as burnt out as they used to be,” says Craig Bryan, associate director of the National Center for Veterans Studies. “I mean there was a while there, they were just driven into the ground, even if they’d not been deployed, it was just keep going more, more, more, more.”

Bromberg agrees. “I think we’d be naive to think that this period of stress and strain doesn’t impact families and soldiers in some way,” he says.

Scientists may never know precisely what led to a steep rise in suicides that Defense Secretary Leon Panetta described as an epidemic.

Many agree it was fueled by the cumulative strain of fighting two wars at once, an unprecedented demand on an all-volunteer force in which family separations, multiple deployments and combat exposure became a way of life for years.

During periods of weeks or months, more troops were dying by their own hand than were killed in combat, according to military data.

The Army’s many suicides drove up totals for the entire military, leading to a record 351 such deaths among active-duty troops in 2012 — the deadliest suicide year on record for U.S. forces. The subsequent decline in suicides for the Army last year appeared to have the same effect, pushing down total Defense Department suicide numbers for 2013.

Though the Pentagon has not released its 2013 final figures, internal documents show 284 actual and presumed suicides among active-duty troops for the year through Dec. 15, a pace that would leave it significantly lower than 2012 suicides.Even as these deaths among active-duty soldiers declined last year, deaths among those on inactive status — members of the National Guard or reserve who were not called into active duty — remained at record levels.

The Army reported a record 151 suicides among these “citizens soldiers,” whose only contact with the Army are drills one weekend a month and two weeks of training each year. That’s an increase from 140 suicides in this group of soldiers in 2012.

The 150 suicides among active-duty soldiers in 2013 is the lowest number for that service branch since 2008. About one in five of those suicides last year were by soldiers who had never deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan, according to Army figures.

By Gregg Zoroya
USA Today
Published: January 31, 2014

Report: Suicide rate spikes among young veterans

WASHINGTON — The number of young veterans committing suicide jumped dramatically from 2009 to 2011, a worrying trend that Veterans Affairs officials hope can be reversed with more treatment and intervention.

New suicide data released by the department on Thursday showed that the rate of veterans suicide remained largely unchanged over that three-year period, the latest for which statistics are available. About 22 veterans a day take their own life, according to department estimates.

But while older veterans saw a slight decrease in suicides, male veterans under 30 saw a 44 percent increase in the rate of suicides. That’s roughly two young veterans a day who take their own life, most just a few years after leaving the service.

“Their rates are astronomically high and climbing,” said Jan Kemp, VA’s National Mental Health Director for Suicide Prevention. “That’s concerning to us.”

Reasons for the increase are unclear, but Kemp said the pressures of leaving military careers, readjusting to civilian life and combat injuries like post-traumatic stress disorder all play a role in the problems facing young male vets.

Female veterans saw an 11 percent increase in their suicide rate over the same span. Overall, suicide rates for all veterans remain significantly above their civilian counterparts.

The good news, according to the report, is that officials have seen decreases in the suicide rates of veterans who seek care within the VA health system. Of the 22 deaths a day, only about five are patients in the health system.

“What we’re seeing is that getting help does matter,” Kemp said. “Treatment does work.”

Now, she said, the challenge is expanding that outreach. Persuading younger veterans to seek care remains particularly problematic, because of stigma associated with mental health problems.

VA officials have boosted their mental health personnel and suicide hotline staff in recent years, but the outdated data doesn’t reflect those changes.

The report also notes that national rates of suicide have remained steady or increased slightly in recent years, indicating the issue is a larger national health problem, not simply a military and veterans issues.

-http://www.stripes.com/report-suicide-rate-spikes-among-young-veterans-1.261283
By Leo Shane III
Stars and Stripes
shane.leo@stripes.com
Twitter: @LeoShane

MILITARY SUICIDES DROP 2013

WASHINGTON (AP) – Suicides across the military have dropped by more than 22 percent this year, defense officials said, amid an array of new programs targeting what the Defense Department calls an epidemic that took more service members’ lives last year than the war in Afghanistan did during that same period.

Military officials, however, were reluctant to pin the decline on the broad swath of detection and prevention efforts, acknowledging that they still don’t fully understand why troops take their own lives. And since many of those who have committed suicide in recent years had never served on the warfront, officials also do not attribute the decrease to the end of the Iraq war and the drawdown in Afghanistan.

Still, they offered some hope that after several years of studies, the escalating emphasis on prevention across all the services may finally be taking hold.

With two months to go in this calendar year, defense officials say there have been 245 suicides by active-duty service members as of Oct. 27. At the same time last year there had already been 316. Each of the military services has seen the total go down this year, ranging from an 11 percent dip in the Marine Corps to a 28 percent drop for the Navy. The Air Force had a 21 percent decline, while Army totals fell by 24 percent.

The officials provided the data to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to disclose it publicly.

Last year the number of suicides in the Army, Navy, Air Force and Marines spiked to 349 for the full 12-month period, the highest since the Pentagon began closely tracking the numbers in 2001, and up from the 2011 total of 301. There were 295 Americans killed in Afghanistan last year, by the AP’s count.

Military suicides began rising in 2006 and soared to a then-record 310 in 2009 before leveling off for two years. Alarmed defense officials launched an intensified campaign to isolate the causes that lead to suicide, and develop programs to eliminate the stigma associated with seeking help and encourage troops to act when their comrades appeared troubled.

The Pentagon increased the number of behavioral health care providers by 35 percent over the past 3 years and embedded more of them in front-line units. It also beefed up training, expanded crisis phone lines and delivered more than 75,000 gun locks to the services to distribute.

“Suicide is often a perfect storm in an individual life, where many supports and many things come undone around a service member,” said Ami Neiberger-Miller, spokeswoman for the Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors. “I think there’s been a lot of people encouraging our troops who are in trouble to seek help, that help is available, that help can work and that suicide is not the only option.”

While much of the suicide prevention effort involves similar studies and programs, each service has set up its own particular methods to deal with the problem.

Navy Capt. Kurt Scott, director of the service’s suicide prevention programs, said the Navy is working to recognize the causes of stress beforehand and then help sailors figure out ways to deal with it. Often stress is tied to family issues, including the strains of leaving for deployments, substance abuse, depression or financial problems.

A study released this summer in the Journal of the American Medical Association found no evidence of a link between suicide and troops who deployed multiple times to Iraq and Afghanistan combat zones over the past decade.

Scott said that sailors are receiving annual training, including sessions on how to identify stress in their subordinates or comrades. The training also helps sailors identify personal and work-related issues that might cause anxiety as they prepare to deploy, and then suggests ways to deal with the stress — including exercise or talking out the problems with chaplains or other troops.

The Marines have also targeted substance abuse as something that appears to increase the risk for suicides.

Adam Walsh, who works with the Marine Corp’s community counseling and prevention programs, said it’s too early to declare that suicides are declining in general. He said, however, that the Marines are updating an alcohol abuse prevention campaign and also now require that every battalion and squadron have a suicide prevention program officer.

The Army, which is by far the largest military service, has the highest number of suicides so far this year, with 124, while the Air Force had 43, the Navy had 38, and the Marines — the smallest service — had 40.

Army spokesman Paul Prince said the service has certified nearly 2,500 military and civilian leaders to be able to interact with soldiers on suicide prevention, and has conducted thousands of hours of training with the troops.

Price said suicide remains a daunting issue for the Army and the nation and “defies easy solutions.” So the service has expanded soldiers’ access to behavioral health services to improve their ability to cope with the stress that can be caused by separation, deployments, financial pressures, other work-related issues and relationships.

Lt. Col. Brett Ashworth, a spokesman for the Air Force, said airmen have a new program that emphasizes leadership responsibilities in the effort to prevent suicides and a new Air Force website includes tips on recognizing distressed personnel.

 

-Originally posted by AP News

http://bigstory.ap.org/article/apnewsbreak-military-suicides-drop-unclear-why

June 27, 2013 National PTSD Awareness Day Rally, S.C. State House 2:20PM

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT: Ashley Randall

                                                               Public Relations Director

                                                                                                Phone: (803) 873-6540

                                                                                                socialmedia@hiddenwounds.org

 

Hidden Wounds Host National PTSD Awareness Day Rally, S.C. State House

 

COLUMBIA, S.C. – On Thursday, June 27, 2013, Hidden Wounds will host a National PTSD Awareness Day Rally on the State House grounds in Columbia, S.C.  Columbia native’s and founding members Steven Diaz and Anna Bigham of Columbia-based non-profit Hidden Wounds, will lead this Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Awareness Rally beginning at 2:20 PM with closing remarks set for 3:30 PM.

 

Speakers include; The Honorable James E. Smith, Jr., Helen Pridgen, Director of SC AFSP, Mr. Bill Lindsey, Director of NAMI SC, Ms. Wendy Graham and Lisa Mustard, Directors for Psychological Health for the SC Army National Guard, Ms. Ashley Lambert-Wise, CEO Battling Bare, Ms. Amy LeClaire, Director of Suicide Prevention Dorn VA, Ms. Trisha Pruitt, Care Giver, and Lt. Dan Hoffman, USMC Ret., Vietnam Veteran.

 

Awareness Booths include; Team River Runner, PAALS, Sexual Trauma Services of the Midlands, Team Red White & Blue, Mental Health America S.C., Veterans Administration, NAMI, Battling Bare, Center for Health Integration, Hidden Wounds, American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, Combat Veterans Motorcycle Association, Blue Star Mothers of the Midlands, and University of South Carolina Chapter of Student Veterans of America.

 

More than 6,500 American service members have been killed in Iraq and Afghanistan and over 50,000 have been wounded. What those statistics do not take into account are the tens of thousands who suffer from invisible psychological wounds including post-traumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injury and depression. The Veterans Administration and Department of Defense report 22 military veterans die by suicide each day in the United States, nearly 1 military veteran each hour.

 

Hidden Wounds has provided more than 210,000 counseling hours to military veterans nationwide.

 

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Hidden Wounds is a non-profit 501(c)(3) whose mission is to provide interim and emergency counseling services to ensure the psychological health and well being of military veterans and their families. www.hiddenwounds.org #GetInTheFight